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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force. and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-america japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in light of history it was an error. and so today, this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this poi
. and welcome to both of you. >> thank you. >> brown: jim jones, indisputable that the united states practiced torture. at the time the justice department said otherwise, that within very strict rules this was not torture. what made you say this was? >> well, an exhaustive study of the laws of court cases, of the practice, of interviews and the summary of all of it was it was indisputable there was torture in many cases. >> brown: just to be clear: you didn't have subpoena power here and so how were you doing it? you said by talking to people? >> well, the staff and some of the panel members visited several countries, visited the black sites where some of these were in poland, lithuania, et cetera, they talked to officials, they talked to detainees themselves, and they did an exhaustive research of the law and the united states has even brought prosecutions for the very same things that we did in some of those sites. >> brown: david irvine, former u.s. ambassador john bolton told the kwra +*eup that "this report is completely divorced from reality." the procedures were in his words "lawyered a
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
gifford has an op ed this morning. jim is a republican. what you think about what the senate did? we havehere in delaware plenty of gun laws. sure that is the case in a lot places in the country where somebody gets arrested with a gun crime, usually they are able to eliminate that. they do not prosecute for illegal guns. there are plenty of guns laws already. it is just a matter of having the prosecutors have in the nerve to enforce these laws. this is just another attempt by the federal government to disarm the people of the united states and it is not going to make any favorites. lot of this is a distraction from the economy and the fact they refuse to do anything to cut back on the sides of the government. host: are you a gun owner? caller: i do not own a gun but pretty much everyone else i know owns a gun. -- here ins castle new castle, a lot of people did not have guns. guns start leaking out towards this area. people are very open a round here about gun under ship. about gun ownership. are there any further regulations you would support on gun buying? isler: no, i just think it
on this particular issue to comment on this and on her question of the political will. >> thank you very much, jim. if i knew the answer on political will, i suppose there would be more prophetic qualities to my history. one hopes that we will see it, one hopes that we will see immigration and gun control and other efforts. i spent my life as a diplomat and spent a good part of that life trying to importune other governments to live up to the rule of law. i was cha gripped, embarrassed -- chagrined, embarrassed and, indeed, in many ways felt undermined by the notion that our country which instructed me on numerous occasions to uphold the rule of law particularly indefinite detention without trial was something that we now practice and continue to practice despite all of the questions that people tend to want to raise about a war and prisoners of war and all of the rest. my sense is that we need a specific way forward. the report contains recommendations on a specific way forward; simply trial or military commission with rights and privileges equal to our article iii court or system. if that won't
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)